Nutrition Scavenger Hunt

Nutrition Scavenger Hunt

Hello and Happy Friday!

 

My oh, my am I happy it’s Friday. We’ve been on an early release schedule all week to accommodate student-led conferences and I am so ready to get back to our regular routine. You’d think a week of half-days would mean half the amount of work but instead, the opposite has been true!

 

While I am ready for a nap, you didn’t come here to read about my week:) So let’s get back to business and check out the Nutrition Scavenger Hunt!

 

Nutrition Scavenger Hunt - Clue Cards + Folder

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Okay, here are the dets of this activity:

 

  • It’s student-directed, creating an opportunity for students to take ownership of their learning!
  • It can be used as a fitness activity or a stand along teaching tool.
  • It creates an opportunity for physical activity across the curriculum as students wander around the room looking for clues.
  • And of course, it teaches students the fundamental terms and concepts of nutrition.

Nutrition Scavenger Hunt - Student Example

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Here’s how the activity went down: After students chose their partner and got blank worksheets, I gave each pair a numbered folder with a clue inside. Students were asked to first read the clue then to use it to fill in the blanks on their worksheet. After successfully using the clue to answer a question, students were instructed to leave the folder + clue on the desk and go find the next numbered folder. They continued doing this until the worksheet was completely filled out. Then as the pairs finished, they were asked to open a PowerPoint I’d sent to them via Outlook Groups and take independent notes in an effort to gain an even greater understanding of nutrition. They used Chromebooks to complete this final task.

 

Nutrition Scavenger Hunt - Student Led Groups

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As I reflect, I am very happy with this activity. Kids enjoy it because they can work at their own pace, move around the classroom and work with their friends. And from my point of view, I like because it gives me an accurate gauge of what kids do and do not understand as it is difficult to fake understanding in this type of student-directed setting. I also love that the success of this activity is completely dependent on a student’s willingness to take ownership of his/her learning.

 

However, I must admit that I am still frightened to see how much students don’t like to try when they are challenged to read and think independently. And I am left wondering if this is because of a fear of being vulnerable, laziness, an actual struggle with the content/activity or a combination? My hope is that with more activities like this one and the Discovery Walk, I can better answer that question. And of course I hope that a student-directed focuses not only increases my students’ knowledge and understanding of health and wellness but also increase their confidence and willingness to try!

 

P.S. If you liked this, check out our Physical Health Discovery Walk.

 

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